Knowing customers wherever they touch your business

We have seen businesses who have been later entrants into internet and even mobile shopping losing ground as they lose customers who view such retailers as out-of-touch with their requirements. HMV was a great example where it seems their lack of investment in online in preference for diversification left a great brand anachronistic and irrelevant for its customer base and struggling for market share.
Today’s consumer wants a relationship with a brand that he or she values, trusts and wants to participate with through any channel. In return they want to be recognised as the same customer whether they engage on-line, in-store or on a mobile device.
Contact through any of these are valuable touchpoints where the relationship can be tested and data acquired, validated or augmented.
We had one client in fashion retail who were looking to stop publishing their printed catalogue since the number of orders being placed by phone or order form was declining. Analysis of how many of their best customers wished to manage the relationship across all channels was fascinating; typically they would wait eagerly for the latest catalogue and then having selected the items that attracted them they would go on-line to browse these products in more detail. Having made the decision, they would then visit their local high street branch and try the product and buy in-store. Taking away the catalogue would have had severe implications on their store sales.
The key is to recognise the customer however they present themselves to the business but ideally without the need for a loyalty card to encumber the experience as it replaces the enjoyment of shopping with a mundane device. In the work I did in the UK theme park sector in the 1990s and 2000s we shunned a ‘back-to-earth’ effect of data capture, relying alternatively on an in-context method of acquiring data which became part of the fun day out.
Once this can be achieved in retail (and I have some ideas of how to do it) the relationship can be integrated and rather than just today’s special offer being emailed or sent by SMS message, the individual can enjoy a much more tailored experience.
If any retailers would like to discuss this methodology do get in touch at mc@dmcounsel.co.uk.

Advertisements

Scoring your customers

Companies must continue communicating with their customers through a consistent strategy that is driven by customer insight. Rating current customers is not solely based on how much they spend but has as its basis the classic RFM (or RFV in the UK) model that creates a score based on recency, frequency and monetary value. My recommenation is not to stop there but to add more elements such as Returns, Complaints, number of enquiries, length of time they have been a customer and create a contact plan that reacts to the dynamics of these scores.

Often we will identify cohorts of customers that represent bad business. The solution can either be to review the business process for how you do business with them, e.g. relegating them to an ‘exclusive’ on-line relationship where the cost of managing them is reduced rather than taking up the time of a salesman or telephone agent; alternatively the bullet might have to be bitten and you resign the account.

However, building segmentations or communities of valuable, profitable customers by profile and comparing their behaviour will also drive the communication; but don’t just use it to determine when to make contact. Customer insight should also drive the ‘next best proposition’ for each customer so that the sales person can be proactive in establishing opportunity. What you know about your customers can also be used to drive new customer acquisition by comparing prospects’ profiles with your customers and determining the best proposition.

Customers rate companies with whom they deal by the quality of the communications and this means relevance, personalisation and timeliness.

Can you risk leaving travel customers to make up their own minds?

A recent survey by Directline Holidays concludes that  Word of Mouth is most trusted recommendation when it comes to booking the right trip.

Travel companies have the ability to build and nurture such tactics from within their own customer data. Considering the customer’s overall relationship with the company will assist in creating a customer journey that delivers advocates who will either perform actively or passively for the brand.

Active advocacy is where the satisfied customer will recommend the firm to their relations, friends and wider acquaintances; sometimes a reward sweetens the process. Passive advocacy is where using what you know about your best customers enables you to ‘clone’ new customers who are likely to appreciate similar destinations and levels of service and so behave in a similar manner.

All of this can achieved by collecting and maintaining the right data about customers, engaging them in a relationship and progressing them up the “loyalty staircase” to advocacy.

The survey also stated that “almost a quarter of those surveyed said they were not influenced by anything” (source: e-tid 20/8/12). Can you risk your customers being left to their own devices? Make sure they are influenced by their peers, by relevant propositions and a customer relationship that delivers real benefits.